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Public invited to listen in on meeting about Marine Recreational Information Program (MRIP)
Wednesday, April 3, 2013

Recreational fishermen and other members of the public are invited to participate in an informal discussion with the Council about recent and upcoming changes in the Marine Recreational Information Program (MRIP). The listening session will be held on April 9 in Raleigh, NC in conjunction with the Council’s April Meeting. Rob Andrews from NOAA Fisheries will give a brief overview of recent and upcoming changes to MRIP catch and effort surveys and several other aspects of the program. Following the presentation, Rob and Council leadership will take questions and comments (in person and via online chat) from the public.

Recreational data quality was one of the most frequently mentioned concerns among anglers during the Council’s 2011/2012 Visioning Project. The MRIP team at NOAA is aware of these concerns and has spent the past several years working to improve recreational data collection methods. As a result, NOAA is making several changes in the ways that recreational catch and effort are estimated.

As of March 1, 2013, a redesigned Angler Intercept Survey (also known as “dockside sampling”) has been fully implemented. The new survey is expected eliminate or reduce potential sources of bias in estimations of recreational catch.

New catch estimation methods are undergoing testing in four states. These methods were based on MRIP studies which demonstrated that mail surveys of both postal addresses and fishing licenses are effective ways to collect fishing effort data. If the current tests are successful, coast-wide implementation of the survey is expected in 2014.

Want to know more about these changes or find out how you might be affected? Got ideas for future survey improvements? Attend our next listening session and let us know!


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